Recognizing Strengths - 2

Foundational

Teachers

Goal: During an activity (either structured or unstructured), the student will identify more than 1 personal strength in 8 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Identify the attributes of a strength (such as it is enjoyable, never tire of doing it or practicing it, etc.).
2. Identify a strength in a friend, classmate or family member.
3. Create a list of personal strengths.

Definitions of Key Terms: A strength is a positive quality about ourselves, such as something we are good at or defines our character.

Discussion Points:

  • We all have things we are good at. These are our character strengths.
  • Share with students that a strength does not always mean someone is strong physically.
  • We all have things we are good at. These are our character strengths.
    • Personality
    • Academic areas
    • Sports
    • Fine and performing arts

Provide examples of where you can see strengths in a person or themselves. Below are some broad ideas to share:

Possible activities to review the discussion points include the following:

  • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
  • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a sticky note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a sticky note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right, they may put their team's marker (x or o) on the grid.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: What Are Sharacter Strengths?

Prior to the activity, make slips of paper or use index cards with strengths written on each. You can use the strengths listed below or make your own list. Place the cards/slips in a bag or basket.

Materials Needed:
  • Slips of paper or index cards
  • Bag or basket

Gather students in a circle. Have students take turns drawing out a slip/card. Ask each to read the strength and provide a definition or what they think it means. You can allow them to give an example of the strength if they cannot clearly define it on their own. Brainstorm with the group someone they know who demonstrates the strength.

Review the discussion points regarding strengths.

Cooperative

Honest

Brave

Hard Working

Generous

Dependable

Creative

Curious

Determined

Caring

Activity 2: That’s Me!

Prior to the activity, print out two copies of the character strength cards. Cards can be found https://www.silassolutions.com/files/Silas/Lessons/118.pdf

Cut the cards out and tape one set around the classroom. Keep one set for the activity/discussion.

Review the discussion and ideas shared in Activity 1. Review the definition of a strength with students as well. Using the second printed set of cards, review each one to make sure students understand what each one means. Let them know you have taken another set of the same cards and taped them up around the room.

Instruct students that when you say go, they will have about a minute to move around the room and find the strength with which they most closely identify with. Encourage them to go to the strength they feel and not where their friends go.

After students have located their strength, gather them back together to discuss why they picked the strength they chose. Ask students to think of a strength that would match a classmate and share why.

Activity 3: What are you good at?

Review the ideas and discussion points from Activities 1 and 2. be sure to review what the definition of a character strengths is. Share with them a situation in which you exhibited a strength, but it was not a strength you display all the time. Discuss that sometimes we have different strengths depending on the situation. For example, a strength you show at school but not at home.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Instruct the students to think of their strengths and the situations in which they usually show them. Ask students to complete Student Activity Sheet A.

After completion, gather the students to discuss their answers and why.

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: Write down what you consider to be your strengths in each of the following settings:

At home

At school

With my friends

I think my number 1 trait is:

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts from the immersive reader. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet B.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student Activity Sheet C - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

After students have finished, discuss their answers to the questions together. If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Optional: After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity, provide students a copy of Student Activity Sheet C. Point out to students the features of script text that indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete Student Activity Sheet C.

After the students have completed Sheet C, display the script using the immersive reader and highlight the nouns in the script. Students can self-check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs.

Example script of correctly recognizing strengths:
Tori: Good morning Mr. B. Is there anything I could help you with this morning?
Mr. B: Sure, could you please help pass out these papers.
Tori: I would love to. Mr. B: Thank you, you are so considerate.

Example script of incorrectly recognizing strengths:
Tori: Good morning Mr. B. Is there anything I could help you with this morning?
Mr. B: Sure, could you please help pass out these papers?
Tori: I would love to.
Mr. B: Thank you, you have such a great sense of humor.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below is a book that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for students’ level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • True You: Authentic Strengths for Kids, Fatima Doman

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Think about the script read/played for the class and complete the questions below.

1. Who are the characters in this script?

2. What did Tori help Mr. B with?

3. What was Tori’s strength?

4. How do you think Mr. B felt when Tori offered to help?

5. How do you feel when you are asked to stop doing something you enjoy?

Student Activity Sheet C

Directions: In the scripts below circle in purple two nouns that name a person and one noun that names a place. Circle in red two verbs.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb verb describes an action, a state, or an occurrence.

Example script of correctly recognizing strengths:
Tori: Good morning Mr. B. Is there anything I could help you with this morning?
Mr. B: Sure, could you please help pass out these papers.
Tori: I would love to. Mr. B: Thank you, you are so considerate.

Example script of incorrectly recognizing strengths:
Tori: Good morning Mr. B. Is there anything I could help you with this morning?
Mr. B: Sure, could you please help pass out these papers?
Tori: I would love to.
Mr. B: Thank you, you have such a great sense of humor.

Application Activity

Review and discuss example scripts from the lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating character strengths. You may provide a strength to each student or allow them to select their own. Use the script sheet to create students' scripts.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Have students record their scripts using SiLAS software for social skills. Remind students to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialogue with a phone or other recording device

Topic Checkout

Review all the discussion points and key ideas from Activities 1, 2 and 3. Ask students to complete the Student Topic Checkout. If time allows, gather the students together to have them share their answers.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout
  • Crayons, markers, colored pencils, and/or old magazines and glue

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Use crayons, markers, colored pencils, or letters from magazines to create an image of your character strengths.