Patience - 2

Foundational

Table of Contents

Teachers

Definition: Patience: To wait calmly for something or someone without complaining.

Discussion Points

  • Why is patience important?
  • When do I need to be patient?

Discuss with students what it means to be patient. Review the discussion point question

Possible activities to review the discussion point:

  • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
  • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a post-it note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their teams marker (x or o) on the grid.

Activity 1: Pass the Present

In advance, wrap a box containing a small gift for students (examples: candy, eraser, new pencil) in many layers. Ask the students to sit in a circle and explain to them that they must slowly unwrap the present. The trick is each student will unwrap only one layer.

After the present has been unwrapped pass out the contents inside.

Materials Needed:
  • Wrapped present in many layers
  • Chart paper or chalkboard

Discussion

  • Explain to students that patience is the ability to wait calmly for something or someone without complaining.
  • How did you feel having to wait patiently for your turn to unwrap a layer?
  • How did you feel having to wait patiently to see what was in the package?
  • Ask students to show a thumbs up or thumbs down if they felt they did a good job waiting calmly. What could they have done differently?

Brainstorm a list of times students are required to be patient.

Examples: waiting for recess, going to a friend’s house, lunch, when someone else is talking

Activity 3: Thumbs up, Thumbs Down

Read the each scenario allowed. If the situation describes practicing patience appropriately have the students give you a thumbs up. If it describes practicing patience in appropriately have students give you a thumbs down. Discuss each scenario and why it does or does not demonstrate patience.

Materials Needed:
  • Scenarios below
  • Silas is excited for lunch. As the class is waiting in the lunch line Silas pushes his way past everyone else and moves to the front of the line.
  • During class discussion Anya cannot wait to share about her new dog. She raises her hand and waits for her teacher to call on her.
  • Mr. B and Dr. Sally are talking in the hallway. Donny needs to tell Mr. B something very important. He patiently stands beside Mr. B and waits for him to finish talking
  • During math Tori wants to share the answer to the math problem. She raises her hand but then blurts out the answer before being called on.
  • If time allows:

    Pass out Tootsie Pops to each student. Show students the classic tootsie roll commercial asking how many licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop.

    Explain that it takes patience to see how many licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop and that sometimes patience is hard. Allow students share when it is hard for them to show patience.

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Utilizing the immersive reader students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts below. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on student activity sheet B.

After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student activity sheet C - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

Example script of demonstrating patience appropriately:
Tori: I had a really fun night last night. First we went to McDonald’s. Then we went to see a movie.
Donny: That sounds fun!

Example script of demonstrating patience inappropriately:
Tori: I had a really fun night last night. First we went to McDonald’s. Then we went to see a movie.
Donny: (Interrupting Tori in the middle of talking) What did you do? Where did you go? Who did you go with?

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity provide students a copy of student activity sheet C. Point out to students the features of script text to indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete activity sheet C.

Display the script using the immersive reader, highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs and syllables.
If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Script Writing and Animation

Review and discuss example scripts from lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating patience appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to create students scripts.

Have students record their scripts using SiLAS software for social skills. Remember to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Lesson Review

Allow students time to complete the student lesson review. Discuss answers when finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Lesson Review Sheet - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Llama Llama Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney
  • Leo the Late Bloomer by Robert Kraus
  • Harriet, You’ll Drive me Wild! by Mem Fox
  • Sammy’s Gadget Galaxy by Michael P. Waite
  • Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake by Michael B. Kaplan
  • Jonathan James says, “I Can Hardly Wait!” by Crystal Bowman
  • Out of Patience by Brian Meehl
  • Owl Moon by Jane Yolen
  • Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse by Kevin Henkes
  • Umbrella by Taro Yashima
  • Play with Me by Marie Hall Ets
  • Wait Till the Moon is Full by Margaret Wise Brown
  • Geraldine’s Big Snow by Holly Keller
  • "Slowly, Slowly, Slowly,” said the Sloth by Eric Carle

Students

Go to only student curriculum

Student Activity Sheet B

Who are the characters in this script?

Where did Tori go?

How did Donny show patience inappropriately?

How do you think Tori felt when Donny interrupted him?

How do you feel when others interrupt you?

Student Activity Sheet C

Directions: In the scripts below circle two nouns in purple that name a person and one noun that names a place. In red circle two verbs.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names describe an action, state, or occurrence.

Example script of demonstrating patience appropriately:
Tori: I had a really fun night last night. First we went to McDonald’s. Then we went to see a movie.
Donny: That sounds fun!

Example script of demonstrating patience inappropriately:
Tori: I had a really fun night last night. First we went to McDonald’s. Then we went to see a movie.
Donny: (Interrupting Tori in the middle of talking) What did you do? Where did you go? Who did you go with?

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity provide students a copy of student activity sheet C. Point out to students the features of script text to indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete activity sheet C.

Display the script using the immersive reader, highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs and syllables.
If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Directions: How many syllables do you hear in the words below?

Student Lesson Review Sheet

A patient person is someone who

It is difficult to be patient because

I need to be patient when