Cooperation - 2

Foundational

Teachers

Goal: In a given social situation, the student will use cooperative learning strategies in 9 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Listen to and acknowledge ideas and suggestions from others.
2. Participate equally in a task, assignment, activity or conversation.
3. Share materials with others in order to complete a task or job together.

Definitions of Key Terms: Helping one another by working together to complete a task or job.

Questions:

  • We use cooperation when we are playing a game or on a team.
  • We use cooperation when we are completing group projects in class.
  • Using cooperation to solve a problem or complete a task or job makes the work easier.

Discuss with students what it means to work together using cooperation. Review the discussion point questions.


Possible activities to review the discussion points or use your own:

Think. Pair. Share: The teacher will pose questions related to the discussion points. Explain to students that the purpose of the activity is to think about the question and activate prior knowledge. The teacher will model the procedure to facilitate student understanding.

  • T (Think): Teacher begins by asking a specific question using the discussion topics.
  • P (Pair): Each student should be paired with another student, small group or work with a teacher. Pairs write brief answers on sticky notes or scrap paper.
  • S (Share): Students share their thinking with their partner. Teacher then leads a whole-group conversation using students’ answers.

SEL Categories Activity:

  • Ask students to create a list of words associated with the topic (give them 2-5 minutes to complete).
  • Once time is up, ask each student to share a word or thought from their list.
  • Other students must cross that word or thought off their list.
  • Continue the process until all words or thoughts have been listed.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: 52 card pick up

Prior to starting: Gather a deck of cards for each group and a basket or bin to collect the cards during the activity.

Separate the students into groups of one, two, or three students each. Station each group around the room and toss a deck of cards onto the floor in front of each group.

Materials Needed:
  • 1 deck of cards for each group you will make
  • 1 basket or bin for each group you will make
  • T-Chart below made on chart paper or interactive board

Instruct the students that when you say go, each group will work to collect all the cards. However, each person in the group may only pick up one card at a time. All cards should be placed in the bin or basket you gave each group. When the group has finished, they may sit down where they are stationed.

After the activity is complete, ask the students to discuss which groups finished faster. Ask students to offer ideas on why some groups finished more quickly than others.

Discussion Questions:

  • Do you think groups with multiple students could have done the job as quickly as they did if they had been arguing the whole time instead?
  • Do you think groups with multiple students could have done the job as quickly as they did if only one person had been picking up cards instead?
  • Explain that effective cooperation can make a job easier and quicker.

Brainstorm with students what cooperation looks like, how a team should act, and what cooperation sounds like with examples of cooperative language. Complete the chart below with ideas and suggestions from students.

Cooperation Looks Like Cooperation Sounds Like
Ex. Taking turns Ex. I agree with you because...

Discuss the importance of using cooperative actions and language when working together.

Activity 2: Thumbs up, Thumbs down

Review the key points from Activity 1. Instruct students to listen carefully as you read a situation to them. If the situation demonstrates cooperation, they should show a thumbs up. If it does not demonstrate cooperation, they should show a thumbs down.

Materials Needed:
  • Situations or create your own

Discuss why each answer was chosen. For the situations not showing cooperation, ask students to to think about and offer a suggestion to make it more cooperative.

Scenario 1: Silas trips and falls in the hallway. He drops all his books. Donny rushes over and quickly helps him pick them up.

Scenario 2: Dr. Sally asks for the class to help her in picking up the papers she dropped. Everyone runs out to recess instead.

Scenario 3: Tori and PJ are playing a game together. They work nicely together taking turns. Each had fun and may play the game again.

Scenario 4: Mr. B. and Officer Dave plant flowers in the local park.

Scenario 5: Chris must pick up all his legos before going outside to play. Donny rushes outside and doesn’t wait for Chris.

Scenario 6: Alice has several colored pencil sets. Bob asks Alice to borrow a few pencils so he can finish the art assignment. Alice says no and that he should buy his own to use.

Activity 3: Hula Hoop Challenge

Review the key points from Activities 1 and 2. Review the rules for the Hula Hoop Challenge. Pair the students together and then begin. You may also want to demonstrate the rules first.

Materials Needed:
  • Hula Hoop

Rules

  1. Each teammate must keep both index fingers attached to the hula hoop at all times. If one team member disconnects from the hoop, they must start over.
  2. The hoop must rest on top of each student’s index fingers. Students may not curl fingers around the hoop. Index fingers must point in toward the middle of the hoop at all times.
  3. Students may not use any other body part, and the hoop may not touch any other body part on accident. If this happens, the team must start over.

Directions

  1. Start by getting all team members to rest the hoop on only their index fingers pointing forward.
  2. Raise the hoop to shoulder height.
  3. Lower the hoop from team members’ shoulders to their knees. If they disconnect or grip the hoop with their fingers, they must start over.

Encourage students to be problem solvers and to try anything within the rules. For example: stand in a different position; in and outside the hoop, try the challenge on their knees or sitting on the floor.

Discuss how cooperation was used and how students felt during the activity.

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts from the immersive reader. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet A.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or pen

After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity, provide students a copy of Student Activity Sheet B. Point out to students the features of script text that indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete Student Activity Sheet B.

Display the script using the immersive reader and highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named nouns. Repeat for verbs.

If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Example script demonstrating cooperation appropriately:
Mr. B: Donny will you help me clean up the art supplies?
Donny: Sure, I would love to help you.
Mr. B: Thank you so much. You were such a help.
Donny: No problem, any time.

Example script demonstrating cooperation inappropriately:
Mr. B: Donny will you help me clean up the art supplies?
Donny: No! Why would I ever help you?
Mr. B: Donny it’s important to use cooperation and help others.
Donny: I don’t like cooperating. Do it yourself.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Anything Is Possible, Guilia Belloni
  • Bat’s Big Game, Margaret Read MacDonald
  • Dog vs. Cat, Chris Gall
  • Duck in the Truck, Jez Alborough
  • Going Places, Paul A. Reynolds
  • Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast, Josh Funk
  • My Friend Rabbit, Eric Rohmann
  • Red and Yellow’s Noisy Night, Josh Selig
  • Stone Soup, Jon J. Muth
  • Swimmy, Leo Lionni
  • The Day the Crayons Quit, Drew Daywalt
  • The Juice Box Bully, Bob Sornso and Maria Dismondy
  • The Junkyard Wonders, Patricia Polacco
  • The Little Red Fort, Brenda Maier
  • The Seven Chinese Brothers, Margaret Mahy
  • The Tale of Pip and Squeak, Kate Duke
  • The Whispering Town, Jennifer Elvgren
  • Up the Creek, Nicholas Oldland

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: Think about the script read/played for the class and complete the questions below.

1. Who are the characters in this script?

2. What would Mr. B. like Donny to do?

3. How does Donny demonstrate cooperation?

4. How do you think Mr. B. feels when Donny is cooperative?

5. How do you feel when others are uncooperative?

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: In the scripts below, circle in purple two nouns that name a person and one noun that names a place. In red, circle two verbs.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names describe an action, a state, or an occurrence.

Example script demonstrating cooperation appropriately:
Mr. B: Donny will you help me clean up the art supplies.
Donny: Sure, I would love to help you.
Mr. B: Thank you so much. You were such a help.
Donny: No problem, any time.

Example script demonstrating cooperation inappropriately:
Mr. B: Donny will you help me clean up the art supplies.
Donny: No! Why would I ever help you?
Mr. B: Donny it’s important to use cooperation and help others.
Donny: I don’t like cooperating. Do it yourself.

Application Activity

Review and discuss example scripts from the lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating cooperation appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to create students' scripts.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remind students to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialogue with a phone or other recording device

Topic Checkout

Review key points from previous activities. Ask students to complete the Student Topic Checkout. Discuss their answers when all have finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Read the statement and check true or false.

1. Cooperation is everyone working together for a common cause.

2. Cooperation involves arguing.

3. Cooperation is one person doing all the work.

4. Cooperation is sharing materials so that the task or job can be completed well and on time.