Cooperation - 2

Foundational

Table of Contents

Teachers

Definition: Working together for a common cause

Discussion Points:

Questions:

  • We use cooperation when we are playing a game or on a team.
  • We use cooperation when we are completing group projects in class.

Discuss with students what it means to try new things. Review the discussion point questions.


    Possible activities to review the discussion point:

  • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
  • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a post-it note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their teams marker (x or o) on the grid.

Activity 1: 52 card pick up

Select three students to assist. In one area toss a deck of cards in the air. In another nearby area toss the second deck of cards. Explain to students which deck is yours and which is theirs. Instruct the students that when you say go you will work to collect all your cards one at a time and place them in the basket and the three students will work to pick up all their cards, each student picking up one card at a time.

After the activity is complete, ask the students observing to determine who finished the job more quickly. (It should be the group with three students.

Materials Needed:
  • 2 decks of cards
  • 2 baskets
  • T-Chart below made on chart paper or chalkboard

Discussion Questions:

  • Do you think these three students could have done the job more quickly if they would have been arguing the whole time?
  • Do you think these three students could have done the job more quickly if one student insisted on doing it all?
  • Explain that effective cooperation can make a job easier and quicker.

Brainstorm with students what cooperation looks like; how a team should act and what cooperation sounds like; cooperative language. Complete the T-chart.

Cooperation Looks Like Cooperation Sounds Like
Ex. Taking Turns Ex. I agree with you because...

Discuss the importance of using cooperative actions and language when working together.

Activity 2: Thumbs up, Thumbs down

Instruct students if the scenario demonstrates cooperation to give you a thumbs up. If it does not demonstrate cooperation give you a thumbs down. Discuss why each answer was chosen.

Materials Needed:
  • Scenarios

Scenario 1: Silas trips and falls in the hallway. He drops all his books. Donny rushes over and quickly helps him pick them up.

Scenario 2: Dr. Sally asks for the class to help her in picking up the papers she dropped. Everyone runs out to recess instead.

Scenario 3: Tori and PJ are playing a game together. They work nicely together taking turns.

Scenario 4: Mr. B. and Officer Dave plant flowers in the local park.

Scenario 5: Chris must pick up all his legos before going outside to play. Donny rushes outside and doesn’t wait for Chris.

Activity 3: Hula Hoop Challenge

Encourage students to be problem solvers and to try anything within the rules. (example: stand in a different position; in and outside the hoop, try the challenge on their knees or sitting on the floor.

Discuss how cooperation was used and how students felt during the activity.

Materials Needed:
  • Hula Hoop

Rules

  1. Each teammate must keep both index fingers attached to the hula hoop at all times. If one team member disconnects from the hoop, they must start over.
  2. The hoop must rest on top of each student’s index fingers. Students may not curl fingers around the hoop. Index fingers must point in toward the middle of the hoop at all time.
  3. Students may not use any other body part, and the hoop may not touch any other body part on accident. If this happens, the team must start over.

Directions

  1. Start by getting all team members to rest the hoop on only their index fingers pointing forward.
  2. Raise the hoop to shoulder height.
  3. Lower the hoop from team members’ shoulders to their knees. If they disconnect or grip the hoop with their fingers, they must start over.

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Utilizing the immersive reader students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts below. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on student activity sheet A.

After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student activity sheet B - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

Example script demonstrating cooperation appropriately:
Mr. B: Donny will you help me clean up the art supplies.
Donny: Sure, I would love to help you.
Mr. B: Thank you so much. You were such a help.
Donny: No problem, any time.

Example script demonstrating cooperation inappropriately:
Mr. B: Donny will you help me clean up the art supplies.
Donny: No! Why would I ever help you?
Mr. B: Donny it’s important to use cooperation and help others.
Donny: I don’t like cooperating. Do it yourself.

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity provide students a copy of student activity sheet B. Point out to students the features of script text to indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete activity sheet B.

Display the script using the immersive reader, highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named nouns. Repeat for verbs and syllables.

If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Script Writing and Animation

Review and discuss example scripts from lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating cooperation appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to create students scripts.

Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remember to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Lesson Review

Allow students to complete the student lesson review sheet. Discuss answers when finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Lesson Review Sheet - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Stone Soup by Jon J. Muth
  • The Juice Box Bully by Bob Sornson and Maria Dismondy
  • Swimmy by Leo Lionni
  • The Junkyard Wonders by Patricia Polacco
  • Up the Creek by Nicholas Oldland
  • The Whispering Town by Jennifer Elvgren
  • Going Places by Paul A. Reynolds
  • The Seven Chinese Brothers by Margaret Mahy
  • Anything Is Possible by Giulia Belloni
  • Red and Yellow’s Noisy Night Josh Selig
  • My Friend Rabbit by Eric Rohmann
  • The Tale of Pip and Squeak by Kate Duke
  • Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast by Josh Funk
  • The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt
  • Dog vs. Cat Chris Gall
  • Bat’s Big Game by Margaret Read MacDonald
  • Duck in the Truck by Jez Alborough
  • The Little Red Fort Brenda Maier

Students

Go to only student curriculum

Student Activity Sheet A

Who are the characters in this script?

What would Mr. B like Donny to do?

How does Donny demonstrate cooperation?

How do you think Mr. B feels when Donny is cooperative?

How do you feel when others are uncooperative?

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: In the scripts below circle two nouns in purple that name a person and one noun that names a place. In red circle two verbs.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names describe an action, state, or occurrence.

Example script demonstrating cooperation appropriately:
Mr. B: Donny will you help me clean up the art supplies.
Donny: Sure, I would love to help you.
Mr. B: Thank you so much. You were such a help.
Donny: No problem, any time.

Example script demonstrating cooperation inappropriately:
Mr. B: Donny will you help me clean up the art supplies.
Donny: No! Why would I ever help you?
Mr. B: Donny it’s important to use cooperation and help others.
Donny: I don’t like cooperating. Do it yourself.

Directions: How many syllables do you hear in the words below?

Student Lesson Review Sheet

Directions: Read the statement and check true or false.

Cooperation is everyone working together for a common cause..

Cooperation involves arguing.

Cooperation is one person doing all the work?

Cooperation can make the job easier and quicker.