What Makes Me Angry - 2

Foundational

Teachers

Goal: In fewer than three prompts (visual or verbal), the student will use a learned strategy to manage his/her anger in 8 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Identify when you are getting or are angry.
2. Identify activities or situations that may cause you to feel or become angry.
3. Use a learned strategy to communicate when you are angry.

Definitions of Key Terms: Anger is the feeling people get when something unfair, painful, or bad happens; it is a feeling of displeasure.

Discussion Points:

  • Everyone feels anger.
  • It is ok to feel angry.
  • Controlling your anger is what is most important.
  • You can learn coping skills and strategies to control your anger.

Review the discussion points with the students and consider sharing examples of what makes you angry. Discuss with students what anger is and what signs you can look for.

Possible activities to review the discussion point:

  • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
  • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a sticky note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a sticky note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their team's marker (x or o) on the grid.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: Knowing Your Signs

Discuss the various warning signs that indicate someone is becoming angry. Ask students to share when they have seen these signs in others or felt any themselves. Some examples are: hands ball up into a fist, heart beats fast, face may begin to feel hot or look red.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Record answers from students on the board or chart paper.

Ask students to complete Student Activity Sheet A. After students have finished, gather them together to discuss and share their answers.

Optional Extension Activity: Using newsprint paper or butcher paper, trace the student’s body outline. Allow each student to indicate/mark on their “body” the areas that warn them they are becoming angry.

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: It is important to understand the signs your body gives you to help you know you are getting angry. Think about what signs your body gives you that you are starting to become angry. Circle the signs below.

Activity 2: Anger Buttons

Review discussions and key points from Activity 1 with students. Distribute a copy of Student Activity Sheet B to each student. Share with students that we all have things that can make us angry.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Chart Paper or Interactive Board
  • Pencil for each student

Lead a discussion identifying what actions or requests can make us angry. We can call these our anger buttons. Knowing our anger buttons help us to know situations that may cause us to become angry. This allows us to be prepared to use good coping skills or strategies to manage our anger.

With students, make a list of ideas for anger buttons on the board or chart paper. Ask students to complete Student Activity Sheet B. When they are finished, gather students together to share their answers.

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: What are your anger buttons? Think about what makes you angry. Here are some ideas.

Being teased Being told no
Not getting to do what I want Schoolwork
When the room gets too noisy Not being first
Unfair rules Losing a game

Write what your anger buttons are.

Activity 3: Coping Cards

Review discussion points and key ideas from Activities 1 and 2. Explain to students that coping skills are strategies that we use to help us calm down or react to a situation in a less angry way.

Materials Needed:

Ask students to think and share any strategies they already know or use. Record answers on the board or chart paper.

Distribute Student Activity Sheet C to each student. Review the coping skills on the sheet and point out the blank areas that they can use to draw in their own coping skills. Ask students to select the skill cards that they feel would help them to calm down when angry. Students should cut those out and put them in a place where they can use them when they start to feel angry.

Examples of where to place the cut out coping cards: tape on student's desk, thread through a lanyard, hold up as visual cue for student as needed.

Coping cards can be found at: https://www.silassolutions.com/files/Silas/Lessons/51.pdf

Student Activity Sheet C

Directions: Coping skills are strategies we use to help us calm down. Look at the coping skills below. Which ones help you calm down when you are becoming angry? Cut out the ones that help you the most. Put them in a place where you can use them when you start to feel angry.

Examples: tape on students' desk, wear them on a lanyard

Student Activity Sheet C can be found at: https://www.silassolutions.com/files/Silas/Lessons/51.pdf

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts from the immersive reader. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet D.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet D - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student activity sheet E - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

After students have finished, gather the students together and review answers.

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity and discussing the answers to Student Activity Sheet D, instruct students on the features of script text that indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Display the script using the immersive reader and highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self-check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs and syllables.

If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Example script of dealing with anger appropriately:
Tori: Hey Anya I really wish I could go first in line today.
Anya: I’m sorry, it’s my day to go first.
Tori: (counts backwards from 10)Ok, maybe I can go first tomorrow.

Example script of dealing with anger inappropriately:
Tori: Hey Anya I really wish I could go first in line today.
Anya: I’m sorry, it’s my day to go first.
Tori: (anger) No, I want to go first! (shoving Anya out of the way)

Optional: You may also include a review of grammar topics (identifying nouns and verbs) using the script. Student Activity Sheet E can then be given to students as a practice activity for identifying nouns/verbs on their own; you may also pair the students together and have each pair complete Student Activity Sheet E.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Angry Octopus, Lori Lite
  • Cool Down and Work Through Anger, Cheri Meiners
  • I Am So Angry, I Could Scream: Helping Children Deal with Anger, Laura Fox
  • I Hate Everything! A book about feeling angry, Sue Graves
  • I Was So Mad, Mercer Mayer
  • Mouse Was Mad, Cheri J. Meiners
  • The Very Frustrated Monster, Linda Urban
  • When I Feel Angry, Albert Whitman
  • When Miles Got Mad, Sam Kurtzman-Counter
  • When Sophie Gets Angry-Really, Really, Angry, Molly Bang

Student Activity Sheet D

Directions: Think about the script read/played for the class and complete the questions below.

Student Activity Sheet E

Directions: In the scripts below, circle in purple two nouns that name a person and one noun that names a place. Circle in red two verbs.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb verb describes an action, a state, or an occurrence.

Example script of dealing with anger appropriately:
Tori: Hey Anya I really wish I could go first in line today.
Anya: I’m sorry, it’s my day to go first.
Tori: (counts backwards from 10) Ok, maybe I can go first tomorrow.

Example script of dealing with anger inappropriately:
Tori: Hey Anya I really wish I could go first in line today.
Anya: I’m sorry, it’s my day to go first.
Tori: (angrily) No, I want to go first! (shoves Anya out of the way)

Application Activity

Review key ideas from Activities 1, 2 and 3. Review and discuss example scripts from the lesson extension, if you completed it..

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

In pairs or small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating appropriate and inappropriate ways of coping with anger. Use the script sheet to create students' scripts.

Have students record their scripts using SiLAS software for social skills. Remind students to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialogue with a phone or other recording device

Topic Checkout

Review all discussions and key ideas from past activities and student work.

Discuss the appropriate responses to the following situations or create your own situations to use:

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout - 1 per student
  • A pencil for each student
  • PJ feels his body temperature is rising and he is beginning to shake because Mr. B said it was time for recess to be over.
  • Tori is playing a game and is upset because she is not winning. She is ready to throw the game pieces.
  • Silas can feel his heart pounding hard and he feels like yelling because Anya is not playing fairly.
  • Donny is in class and it is getting so loud, he feels like running out of the room.

Allow students time to practice their coping skills with a partner or ask pairs to role play each situation.

Ask students to complete the Student Topic Checkout. Gather the students together after completion and share answers.

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Answer the following questions.