Problem Solving - 2

Foundational

Table of Contents

Teachers

Definition: Problem solving means finding solutions to difficult problems or situations.

Discussion Points

  • Everyone has problems and the ability to solve them.
  • A problem is a question that needs answered or a situation that creates difficulty.
  • I can take steps to successfully solve problems.

Discuss with students what bullying means. Review the discussion point questions.

Possible activities to review the discussion point:

  • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
  • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a post-it note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their teams marker (x or o) on the grid.

Activity 1: What Would You Do?

Read the scenario to the students. For each scenario encourage students to share how they would solve the problem and what is important to them when making this decision.

Materials Needed:
  • Scenarios listed below
  • T-chart below made on chart paper or chalkboard

Scenario 1: Silas was with a group of friends at recess. The class bully calls him a name. His friends urge him to fight. Silas know that if he fights, the bully will win (and they will both get in trouble), but he doesn’t want his friends to call him a “wimp”.s

Scenario 2: Last week, Tori’s best friend invited her to the movies on Sunday. Today a very popular girl at school invited her to go with her family to the new amusement park on the same day. Tori really wanted to go to the amusement park.

Discuss with students the definition of a problem.

Ex. A problem is a question that needs to be answered. A problem is a situation that is difficult or puzzling.

Brainstorm problems students may face in their lives. Fill in the chart.

Problems at Home Problems at School

Activity 2: Solve It!

Share with students the steps needed for solving problems.

  • Define the problem – What problem are you trying to solve?
  • Brainstorm ideas – What are some ways to solve the problem?
  • Decide on a solution – What are you going to do?
  • Implement the solution – Try your solution.
  • Review the results – Did you successfully solve the problem?
  • Materials Needed:
    • Problem solving cards from below
    • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per group
    • Pencil for each group

    Break students into pairs or small groups and give each group a problem card as well as a problem-solving sheet. Allow time to work to solve the problem. Review problems and solutions as a class.

    I "borrowed" money from Mom's purse without asking and she found out. I got grounded on the night I was planning to go to the movies with a friend.
    Johnny has been picking on me at recess and threatened to beat me up if I told anyone. My best friend told the teacher a "big lie and I don't know what to do
    My friend wants me to shoplift with him. I stayed up late watching my favorite TV show and didn't get my homework done.

    Activity 3: Thumbs, Thumbs Down

    Listen to the scenarios. If the scenario describes good problem solving students should give the teacher a thumbs up. If it describes poor problem solving a thumbs down should be given. If it is a thumbs down discuss what the character should be doing differently.

  • Tori overheard Donny tell a friend that he was going to steal the answers to the math test from Mr. B’s desk. Tori asked Donny to share the answers with her or she would tell Mr. B.
  • Officer Dave saw Anya run over some flowers in the park. Officer Dave asked Anya about this. Anya explained that she did not see them and offered to replant some flowers.
  • Chris found $20 at recess. He quickly turned the money in to the office.
  • Silas forgot to do his homework. He lied to Mr. B and said that his grandma was sick and had to go to the hospital.
  • Materials Needed:
    • Scenarios

    Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

    Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Utilizing the immersive reader students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts below. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on student activity sheet B.

    After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

    Materials Needed:
    • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
    • Pencil for each student
    • Student activity sheet C - 1 per student
    • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

    Example of effective problem solving:
    Dr. Sally: Good afternoon Officer Dave. I have lost my keys. Could you help me?
    Officer Dave: Sure, let’s stop and think about where they might be. Where have you gone today?
    Dr. Sally: First I went the the park and then I went to the cafeteria.
    Officer Dave: Wait, I am sorry. I shouldn’t have said that. I wanted to ride with Ken but I just acted badly by talking to you like that.
    Dr. Sally: Let’s look in the park.
    Officer Dave: Great, let’s go.

    Example of ineffective problem solving:
    Dr. Sally: (angry and yelling) I have lost my keys. My life is just awful.
    Officer Dave: Calm down Sally. Let’s try to take some deep breaths and try to think.
    Dr. Sally: (angry, yelling and waving arms) I can’t, I’ve lost my key.

    After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity provide students a copy of student activity sheet C. Point out to students the features of script text to indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

    Allow students time to complete activity sheet C.

    Display the script using the immersive reader, highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs and syllables.

    If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

    Script Writing and Animation

    Review and discuss example scripts from lesson extension.

    In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating effective problem solving and ineffective problem solving. Use the script sheet to create students scripts.

    Have students record their scripts using SiLAS software. Remember to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

    Materials Needed:
    • Script sheet for each group
    • Pencil for each student

    Lesson Review

    Allow students time to complete the student lesson review. Discuss answers when finished.

    Read Aloud Recommendations:

    Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Ira Sleeps Over by Bernard Waber
  • Dog Breath by Dav Pilkey
  • Oliver Button is a Sissy by Tomie dePaola
  • Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion
  • The Little Engine by Watty Piper
  • Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse by Kevin Henkes
  • Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig
  • Enemy Pie by Derek Muson
  • Materials Needed:
    • Student Lesson Review sheet - 1 per student
    • Pencil for each student

    Students

    Go to only student curriculum

    Student Activity Sheet A

    Directions: Using the problem card given to you by your teacher use this problem-solving sheet to help you solve the problem.

    Define the problem– What problem are you trying to solve?

    Brainstorm ideas – What are some ways to solve the problem?

    Decide on a solution – What are you going to do?

    Implement the solution – Try your solution.

    Review the results – Did you successfully solve the problem?

    Student Activity Sheet B

    Directions: Using the problem card given to you by your teacher use this problem-solving sheet to help you solve the problem.

    Who are the characters in this script?

    What did Dr. Sally lose?

    What did Officer Dave suggest they do as the first step to solve the problem?

    Where is the first place Officer Dave and Dr. Sally decide to look for the keys?

    How do you think Officer Dave feels when Dr. Sally cannot calm down to develop a plan?

    Student Activity Sheet C

    Directions: In the scripts below circle two nouns in purple that name a person and one noun that names a place. In red circle two verbs.

    Remember:

    A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

    A verb names describe an action, state, or occurrence.

    Example of effective problem solving:
    Dr. Sally: Good afternoon Officer Dave. I have lost my keys. Could you help me?
    Officer Dave: Sure, let’s stop and think about where they might be. Where have you gone today?
    Dr. Sally: First I went the the park and then I went to the cafeteria.
    Officer Dave: Wait, I am sorry. I shouldn’t have said that. I wanted to ride with Ken but I just acted badly by talking to you like that.
    Dr. Sally: Let’s look in the park.
    Officer Dave: Great, let’s go.

    Example of ineffective problem solving:
    Dr. Sally: (angry and yelling) I have lost my keys. My life is just awful.
    Officer Dave: Calm down Sally. Let’s try to take some deep breaths and try to think.
    Dr. Sally: (angry, yelling and waving arms) I can’t, I’ve lost my key.

    Directions: How many syllables do you hear in the words below?

    Student Lesson Review Sheet

    Directions: Fill in the blanks with a word from the word bank.

    steps problems situation solve question

    1. Everyone has and the ability to them.

    2. A problem is a that needs answered or a that creates difficulty.

    3. I can take to successfully solve problems.

    implement review brainstorm decide define

    4. the problem – What problem are you trying to solve?

    5. ideas – What are some ways to solve the problem?

    6. on a solution – What are you going to do?

    7. the solution – Try your solution.

    8. the results – Did you successfully solve the problem?.