Growth Mindset - 2

Foundational

Table of Contents

Teachers

Definition: Growth mindset is the belief that your brain can grow through hard work and dedication.

Discussion Points

  • What is a growth mindset?
  • What is a fixed mindset?
  • Why is a growth mindset important?
  • How can a growth mindset help you be successful in life?

Discuss with students what a growth mindset is. Review the discussion point questions.

Possible activities to review the discussion point:

  • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
  • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a post-it note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their teams marker (x or o) on the grid.

Activity 1: Growth Mindset vs. Fixed Mindset

In a large group discuss what it means to grow (develop, change, mature). Develop a list of things that grow. Record answers. (plants, animals, and people) Explain to students that even our brains can grow.

Explain that growth mindset is having the attitude that our most basic abilities can be developed through hard work and dedication. With a growth mindset individuals are always working to develop their skills.

A fixed mindset is the opposite of a growth mindset. It means you think you can’t get better at things, even with practice. When you have a fixed mindset you want to quit and give up.

Materials Needed:
  • Chart paper or chalkboard

Activity 2: Growth Mindset vs. Fixed Mindset Sort

Allow students time to complete student activity sheet A. Discuss when finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student
  • Red and Blue crayon or colored pencil for each student

Activity 3: Change Your Words, Change Your Mindset

Allow students time to complete student activity sheet B. Discuss when finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Utilizing the immersive reader students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts below. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on student activity sheet C.

After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet C - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student Activity Sheet D - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

Example script demonstrating a growth mindset:
Chris: This math is so hard.
PJ: I know it is.
Chris: It may take us some time but I know if we work hard we can do it.
PJ: I think your right! Let’s keep working.

Example script demonstrating a fixed mindset:
Chris: This math is so hard.
PJ: I know it is.
Chris: I quit. I can’t do it.
PJ: Me too. It’s too hard

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity provide students a copy of student activity sheet D. Point out to students the features of script text to indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete activity sheet D.

Display the script using the immersive reader, highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs and syllables.
If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Script Writing and Animation

Review and discuss example scripts from lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating a growth mindset and a fixed mindset. Use the script sheet to create students scripts.

Have students record their scripts using SiLAS software for social skills. Remember to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Lesson Review

Allow students to complete the student lesson review sheet

Materials Needed:
  • Student Lesson Review Sheet - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Beautiful Oops by Barney Saltzberg
  • Whistle for Willie by Ezra Jack Keats
  • Your Fantastic Elastic Brain by JoAnn Deak, Ph.D.
  • Flight School by Lita Judge
  • The OK Book by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
  • Salt in His Shoes by Deloris Jordan
  • Ish by Peter H. Reynolds
  • The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds
  • The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires
  • Rosie Revere, Engineer by Andrea Beaty
  • Wilma Unlimited by Kathleen Krull
  • The Girl Who Never Made Mistakes by Mark Pett and Gary Rubinstein
  • How to Catch a Star by Oliver Jeffers
  • What Do You Do with a Problem? by Kobi Yamada
  • Nadia, the Girl Who Couldn’t Sit Still by Karlin Gray
  • Thanks for the Feedback, I Think by Julia Cook

Students

Go to only student curriculum

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: Read the descriptions below. If it is a characteristic of a growth mindset color it blue. If it is the characteristic of a fixed mindset color it red.

Sees challenges as opportunities to grow Threatened by challenges
Acknowledge weaknesses Intimidated by weaknesses
Pessimistic and unrealistic goals Optimistic and realistic goals
Not easily influenced by peers Easily influenced by peer pressure
Gives up easily Highly persistent
Sees new tasks as feared Sees new tasks as exciting
Believes mistakes are bad Believes mistakes are a chance to grow

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Changing our words can help change our mindset from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. Complete the chart.

Instead of saying: Try saying:
It’s good enough.
I give up.
I’m no good at math.
I made a mistake
I’ll never be as good as that person.
This is too hard.
I’m not good at this.
This plan didn’t work

Student Activity Sheet C

Who are the characters in this script?

What is Chris and PJ working on?

What do Chris and PJ do that demonstrates a growth mindset?

What do Chris and PJ do that demonstrates a fixed mindset?

Student Activity Sheet D

Directions: In the scripts below circle two nouns in purple that name a person and one noun that names a place. In red circle two verbs.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names describe an action, state, or occurrence.

Example script demonstrating a growth mindset:
Chris: This math is so hard.
PJ: I know it is.
Chris: It may take us some time but I know if we work hard we can do it.
PJ: I think your right! Let’s keep working.

Example script demonstrating a fixed mindset:
Chris: This math is so hard.
PJ: I know it is.
Chris: I quit. I can’t do it.
PJ: Me too. It’s too hard

Directions: How many syllables do you hear in the words below?

Student Lesson Review Sheet

Directions: Fill in the blank with growth or fixed.

A mindset is having the attitude that our most basic abilities can be developed through hard work and dedication.

A mindset is the opposite of a growth mindset. It means you think you can’t get better at things, even with practice.

When you have a mindset you want to quit and give up.

With a mindset individuals are always working to develop their skills.