Handling Disagreements - 2

Foundational

Teachers

Goal: In a social situation, the student will use learned strategies to disagree with a peer or adult without escalating the situation, in 8 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Listen to another person’s perspective in a situation.
2. Ask a clarifying question of the other person to help understand their point of view.
3. State a learned and rehearsed response to express your personal opinion when disagreeing with someone (examples such as “I see what you are saying, but…”; That is a good point…”; I am sorry but I disagree with you because….”).

Definitions of Key Terms: Disagreeing means to have a different feeling or opinion about a topic or item than someone else. It means you think or feel differently than others.

Questions to lead discussion:

  • What does it mean to disagree?
  • Is it okay to disagree?
  • Can you disagree with a friend and still be friends?
  • What are the consequences of disagreeing?
  • How do we disagree respectfully and politely?

Some points to remember when disagreeing:

  • Don’t put others down when disagreeing.
  • Ask a clarifying question to understand their point of view.
  • Listen to other peoples point of view.
  • Don’t use abusive/mean language when disagreeing.

Discuss with students what it means to disagree and why it is important to do so in positive and polite ways. Review the discussion questions and points to remember with students.

Possible activities to review the discussion points or use your own:

Think. Pair. Share: The teacher will pose questions related to the discussion points. Explain to students that the purpose of the activity is to think about the question and activate prior knowledge. The teacher will model the procedure to facilitate student understanding.

  • T (Think): Teacher begins by asking a specific question using the discussion topics.
  • P (Pair): Each student should be paired with another student, small group or work with a teacher. Pairs write brief answers on sticky notes or scrap paper.
  • S (Share): Students share their thinking with their partner. Teacher then leads a whole-group conversation using students’ answers.

SEL Categories Activity:

  • Ask students to create a list of words associated with the topic (give them 2-5 minutes to complete).
  • Once time is up, ask each student to share a word or thought from their list.
  • Other students must cross that word or thought off their list.
  • Continue the process until all words or thoughts have been listed.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: Circumstances

As a large group, develop a list of situations or events when you might disagree with other people.

Materials Needed:
  • Chart paper or interactive board

Example: When choosing what activity to do next when you are with your friends.

Record students’ responses on the chart paper or board. Keep the list to use in Activity 2.

Activity 2: Disagreeing Statements

Prior to the activity, make sure the list generated in Activity 1 is visible. Print or make the statement cards also.

Ask students to think about a time when they disagreed with someone and ask for volunteers to share. Ask the student when they share to also give an example of the language or words they used toward the other person in the disagreement.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per group
  • Pencil for each student
  • Index cards or sheets of paper for the statements
  • Statement cards

When we disagree with others there are many respectful words, phrases or statements we can use. Ask students to think of words or phrases that are respectful and positive to use in a disagreement. Add these to the list started in Activity 1. Some examples include:

  • That’s a good idea. Another idea would be ____________________.
  • I’m not sure I agree. Maybe ______________________.
  • Has anyone thought about __________________?
  • I can see where you are coming from however, ______________________.
  • That makes sense but I’d like to add _____________________________.
  • I have a different opinion I think ______________________________.

Separate students into partners or small groups. Present each group with a statement. Ask students to complete Student Activity Sheet A pretending they disagree with the statement. Discuss answers when finished.

Statements to be on individual index cards or piece of paper:

My dad says: Football is the best sport to watch.

My friend says: Math is the best subject in school.

My sister says: Dogs are a better pet than cats.

My neighbor says: Uno is the best game to play.

My mom says: Chocolate is the best kind of ice cream.

My teacher says: Florida is the best place to go on vacation.

The bus driver says: Boys are better at following directions than girls.

The principal says: Pizza is the best food!

Student Activity Sheet A

Direction: Work with your partner or group to determine the best way to respectfully disagree with the statement given to you by your teacher.

What do I disagree with?

Who do I disagree with?

What can I say to respectfully disagree?

Activity 3: Comic Strip Worksheet

Review the key points from the previous activities. Ask students to complete Student Activity Sheet B. Choose volunteers to share their answers when all students have finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Create a comic strip or write a script to show two people having a disagreement respectfully.

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts from the immersive reader. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet C.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet C - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student Activity Sheet D - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

After students have finished, discuss the answers to the listening comprehension questions together.

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity, provide students a copy of Student Activity Sheet D. Point out to students the features of script text that indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete Student Activity Sheet D.

Display the script using the immersive reader and highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs. Ask if any students were able to answer the bonus question and review the answer.

If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Example script demonstrating disagreeing appropriately:
Anya: I am angry that you broke my toy.
Kim: I am sorry that happened, but I didn’t break it.
Anya: Are you sure?
Kim: Yes, I am. Let’s focus on either fixing it or getting you a new one.

Example script of demonstrating disagreeing inappropriately:
Anya: I am angry that you broke my toy.
Kim: No I didn’t. Be quiet!
Anya: You were playing with it.
Kim: I don’t want to speak to you anymore.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

Use current classroom literature that demonstrates or contains disagreeing.

Student Activity Sheet C

Directions: Think about the script read/played for the class and complete the questions below.

1. Who are the characters in this script?

2. What was broken?

3. How did Kim demonstrate disagreeing appropriately?

4. How do you feel when someone disagrees with you inappropriately or uses mean words to disagree with you?

Student Activity Sheet D

Directions: In the scripts below, circle in purple two nouns in that name a person and one noun that names a place. Circle in red two verbs. BONUS: Underline the compound word. Draw a line between the two words that make up the compound word.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names describe an action, a state, or an occurrence.

A compound word is a word that is made from two separate words joined together.

Example script demonstrating disagreeing appropriately:
Anya: I am angry that you broke my toy.
Kim: I am sorry that happened but I didn’t break it.
Anya: Are you sure?
Kim: Yes, I am. Let’s focus on either fixing it or getting you a new one.

Example script of demonstrating disagreeing inappropriately:
Anya: I am angry that you broke my toy.
Kim: No I didn’t. Be quiet!
Anya: You were playing with it.
Kim: I don’t want to speak to you anymore.

Application Activity

Review and discuss example scripts from the lesson extension.

In small groups or pairs, have the students create scripts demonstrating disagreeing appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to create students' scripts.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Ask students to record their scripts using SiLAS software. Remind students to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialogue with a phone or other recording device

Topic Checkout

Review the key points from previous discussion and activities. Ask students to complete the Student Topic Checkout. When everyone is finished, review the answers together.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Answer the following questions.

1. What does it mean to disagree with others?

2. How can you politely and respectfully disagree with others?

3. What are some of the situations that can occur that may cause you to disagree with other people?

4. Could you ask a clarifying question when disagreeing with someone? Why or why not?