Coping Skills - 2

Foundational

Teachers

Goal: When the student is in a social situation, he/she will choose a learned coping strategy in 8 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Create a list of coping skills and strategies that could be used in various social situations.
2. Choose a coping skill/strategy from the student identified/created list when in a social situation.
3. Inform a trusted adult about the social situation.

Definitions of Key Terms: Coping skills help us handle challenging life situations successfully. A coping skill is an action that you can take to lessen a stressful situation or react more positively.

Discussion Points

  • We all have ways we try to cope with strong feelings.
  • Some coping approaches are successful and some are not.
  • Talking to someone you trust, like a parent or an adult, can help when you feel strong emotions.

Discuss these points or consider sharing some of your own experiences with students. If sharing your own, examples can include a time where you used a coping skill in a hard situation and had either a positive or negative outcome/result.

Possible activities to review the discussion points or use your own:

Think. Pair. Share: The teacher will pose questions related to the discussion points. Explain to students that the purpose of the activity is to think about the question and activate prior knowledge. The teacher will model the procedure to facilitate student understanding.

  • T (Think): Teacher begins by asking a specific question using the discussion topics.
  • P (Pair): Each student should be paired with another student, small group or work with a teacher. Pairs write brief answers on sticky notes or scrap paper.
  • S (Share): Students share their thinking with their partner. Teacher then leads a whole-group conversation using students’ answers.

SEL Categories Activity:

  • Ask students to create a list of words associated with the topic (give them 2-5 minutes to complete).
  • Once time is up, ask each student to share a word or thought from their list.
  • Other students must cross that word or thought off their list.
  • Continue the process until all words or thoughts have been listed.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: Coping Strategies

Ask students to raise their hand if they have ever had a bad day. Be sure to have them describe the situation, how they felt, and how they reacted. Ask students to share how they handle bad days. List the responses on chart paper or the board.

Materials Needed:
  • Coping strategies terms on chart paper or interactive board
  • Chart paper or interactive board

Explain to students that there are three types of coping strategies. They are:

  • Helpful: Allows you to regain emotional control. You feel better about yourself and you are respectful to yourself and others.
  • Harmful: Does not allow for emotional control. You may be physically and verbally aggressive towards yourself, others, or property.
  • Time-out: Allows you to calm down. It is temporary and should be used with a positive strategy.

Discuss each strategy and what they mean.

Using the list that students generated on how they handle bad days, ask students to identify which type of coping strategy they used in a given situation.

Activity 2: Coping Strategies Sort

Review the discussion points and key ideas from Activity 1.

Using the list that students generated in Activity 1, review the type of coping strategy that was used in each situation on the list. Ask students to think about how each situation could have been handled differently. Ask them which coping strategy may have been a better choice.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per group
  • Red, green and blue crayon, colored pencil, or highlighters per group

Divide the students into small groups or pair them together. Distribute a copy of Student Activity Sheet A to each group or pair. Ask students to work together to complete the activity sheet. When all groups/pairs have finished, select groups or pairs to share their answers.

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: As a group, look at each coping strategy. Determine if it is a positive coping strategy, negative coping strategy, or time-out strategy. Circle the respective strategy with the following colors:

  • Helpful coping strategy - red
  • Harmful coping strategy - green
  • Time-out strategy - blue
Hit someone Go to a peaceful place
Talk with a trusted adult Hurt myself
Become silent Take deep breaths
Cry Glare at people
Be with friends Exercise
Stomp feet Stretch
Go for a run Get a drink
Kick someone Throw objects
Take a walk Scream
Cuss Sleep
Think of things that make you happy Run away

Activity 3: Comic Strip Worksheet

Review the key points from Activities 1 and 2. Review the list of coping strategies. Ask students to think of 3-5 items from that overall list that they would like to use in future situations.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Distribute a copy of Student Activity Sheet B to each student. Ask students to complete the activity sheet. When students are finished, ask for any that are willing to share their list of coping skills they will be using in the future.

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: For each number below, write a coping strategy/skill that you would be comfortable using in a stressful situation in the future. Try to get 5, but it is okay if you only have 3.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts from the immersive reader. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet C.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet C - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student Activity Sheet D - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or colored highlighters

Once students have finished Student Activity Sheet C, review the answers with them.

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity, provide students a copy of Student Activity Sheet D. Point out to students the features of script text that indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete Student Activity Sheet D.

Display the script using the immersive reader and highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self-check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs, and adjectives/adverbs.

If time allows after completing and discussing both student activity sheets, the students may pair up to role play the script.

Example script demonstrating helpful coping skills:
Chris: Hi Donny, how are you today?
Donny: I’m very worried about my dog. She is sick.
Chris: That’s so sad. Have you tried some helpful coping strategies?
Donny: I’ve been thinking about things that make me happy, like ice cream!

Example script demonstrating harmful coping skills:
Chris: Hi Donny, how are you today?
Donny: I’m very worried about my dog. She is sick.
Chris: That’s so sad. Have you tried some helpful coping strategies?
Donny: (Yelling) Coping strategies are stupid. They don’t help me at all.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Grumpy Pants, Claire Messe
  • How Do Dinosaurs Say I’m Mad?, Jane ole & Mark Teague
  • I Can Handle It, Laurie Wright
  • My Day is Ruined!: A Story Teaching Flexible Thinking, Bryan Smith
  • Of Course It’s a Big Deal, Bryan Smith
  • Oh No, George!, Chris Haughton

Student Activity Sheet C

Directions: Think about the script read/played for the class and complete the questions below.

1. Who are the characters in this script?

2. Why is Donny worried?

3. What helpful coping strategy is Donny using?

4. How do you think Chris feels when Donny yells at him?

Student Activity Sheet D

Directions: In the scripts below circle the nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. Use a different color for each.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names or describes an action, a state, or an occurrence.

An adjective describes a noun.

An adverb describes a verb.

Example script demonstrating helpful coping skills:
Chris: Hi Donny! How are you today?
Donny: I’m very worried about my dog. She is sick.
Chris: That’s so sad. Have you tried some helpful coping strategies?
Donny: I’ve been thinking about things that make me happy, like ice cream!

Example script demonstrating harmful coping skills:
Chris: Hi Donny! How are you today?
Donny: I’m very worried about my dog. She is sick.
Chris: That’s so sad. Have you tried some helpful coping strategies?
Donny: (Yelling) Coping strategies are stupid! They don’t help me at all.

Application Activity

Review and discuss example scripts from the lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating helpful and harmful coping skills/strategies. Use the script sheet to have students create their group’s script.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Have students record their scripts using SiLAS software for social skills. Remind students to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialogue with a phone or other recording device

Topic Checkout

Review the key points from previous activities with the students. Ask students to complete the Student Topic Checkout. When all students have finished, review their answers as a group. Remind the students of the list each student made of coping strategies to use.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout
  • Pencil for each student

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Complete each below.

1. List three helpful coping strategies:

2. List three harmful coping strategies:

3. List three time-out strategies: