Active Listening -1

Basic

Lesson Plan

Goal: While in a learning environment, the student will practice active listening in 8 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Display the body language of an active listener, using your eyes, ears, body and heart.
2. Ask relevant questions related to the topic/situation to demonstrate active listening.
3. Wait until the speaker is finished before asking a question.
4. Follow oral directions given by the teacher.

Definition of Key Terms: Active listening shows others you care and are paying attention to what they are saying. Active listening helps you know and understand what is being said. Active listening can be achieved by using whole body listening.

Discussion Points

  • You use active listening when you are sitting quietly in class and paying attention to what your teacher is saying.
  • You use active listening when you are talking with your friends and you are focused on what they are saying.
  • You use active listening at home when you are listening to your family share about their day.

Discuss with students what active listening means and why it is important. Have students use real-life examples.


    Possible activities to review the discussion point:

  • Pair-Share: Each student partners with another student and shares 3 to 5 facts about themselves (one student at a time). The other student then verbally recalls/repeats the facts back.
  • Develop a list of situations when active listening is important. (Ex. when the teacher is talking). Record answers on the board. Situations can be in school, during virtual learning sessions or out of school (such as the park, playground, ball field, grocery store,etc.).
  • Active listening leads to active learning rather than passive learning.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: Modeling

Start by asking for a student to share on a given topic. (Ex. what they did at recess, what they did over the weekend) Pay close attention to what the student is saying; making good eye contact, not interrupting, and standing or sitting still. Ask appropriate questions of the student that shared to show you were listening.

Materials Needed:
  • Chart paper or Interactive Board

Allow a second student to share but this time walk around the room, interrupt, and turn your back to the student. Ask students which situation demonstrated active listening. Allow the students to share how they felt when you were and were not using active listening. Record student responses in chart paper or the board.

Activity 2: What Is Active Listening

What is active listening?

(Using a Mr. Potato Head is a great way to visually present whole body listening.)

When you are using active listening, you are listening with your whole body.

Materials Needed:
  • Mr. Potato Head
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student, pair of students or small group
  • Pencil - 1 per person or group
  1. You stop what you are doing, and your body is still (stand like a statue)
  2. Your ears are listening to the speaker (point to ears)
  3. Your eyes are watching the speaker (point to eyes)
  4. Your mouth is quiet (pinch lips closed)
  5. Listen with your heart (point to heart)

Allow students time to complete Student Activity Sheet A individually, with a partner, or in a small group. Discuss answers when finished.

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: Directions: Check or Circle Yes if the statement is showing active listening. Check or Circle No if the statement is not showing active listening.

1. Jen turned her back on Tony when he was telling about his family’s dinner at a restaurant last night.

2. Anna looked right at Sally’s face when Sally was telling about her new book.

3. Chris asked Ben more about Ben’s new bike after he had told Chris all about it at lunch.

4. When Donny was listening to PJ tell about a movie he saw last night, Donny was hopping on his toes and looking at the wall.

Activity 3: Game Time!

Practice listening carefully to others by playing one Simon Says.

Materials Needed:
  • None

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Utilizing the immersive reader students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts below. Replay the script if needed. AReplay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet B.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

Example script of demonstrating active listening appropriately:
Dr. Sally: Tori, will you please share with me about your book you read.
Tori: (Looking directly at Dr. Sally and standing still) Sure, it is about a boy who wanted a new puppy and got one for Christmas.
Dr. Sally: (Looking directly at Tori and standing still) That sounds like a really good book.

If time allows, students may partner together and role play the script.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Listen Buddy , Helen Lester
  • Howard B. Wigglebottom Learns to Listen , Howard Binkow
  • Why Should I Listen?, Claire Llewellyn

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Draw a comic to match the script you listened to.

Application Activity

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating how to use active listening. Use the script sheet to assist the groups in creating scripts.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remind students to name and save their recordings. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialog with a phone or other recording device.

Example script of demonstrating active listening appropriately:
Dr. Sally: Tori, will you please share with me about your book you read.
Tori: (Looking directly at Dr. Sally and standing still) Sure, it is about a boy who wanted a new puppy and got one for Christmas.
Dr. Sally: (Looking directly at Tori and standing still) That sounds like a really good book.

Example script of not demonstrating active listening appropriately:
Dr. Sally: Tori, will you please share with me about your book you read.
Tori: (Back towards Dr. Sally, moving around) Sure, it is about a boy who wanted a new puppy and got one for Christmas.
Dr. Sally: (Back towards Tori, walking away) That sounds like a really good book.

Topic Checkout

Review the key points from all previous activities and discussions with the students. Allow students to complete the Student Topic Checkout. Discuss answers as a group when finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout - 1 per student
  • A pencil for each student

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Select the best answer.

1. You demonstrate active listening with your whole body.

2. My brain cannot grow.Your eyes are listening to the speaker.

3. Active listening shows you care.

4. Your body is still when you demonstrate active listening.

5. Your ears are looking at the speaker when you demonstrate active listening.