Eye Contact - Students 2

Foundational

Table of Contents

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Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: With your partner decide who will be student A and who will be student B. Practice the following prompts using good eye contact.

Student A: Hi _____, do you want to go to the movies tonight?
Student B: Hey ______, yes! I will need to ask my mom for permission first.

Practice this prompt by avoiding eye contact.

Student A: Hi ______, do you want to go to the movies tonight?
Student B: Hey ______, yes! I will need to ask my mom for permission first.

Here are some additional prompts to practice.
Hi ______, do you want to go to the park today?
Hello ______, would you like to go to the mall?

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Make a list of situations when it is important to maintain appropriate eye contact. Example: When a police officer is speaking to you.

Directions: On the list above, draw a star next to each situation in which you find it difficult to maintain eye contact. In the box below, describe why you find it difficult.

Student Activity Sheet C

Directions: Study the comic strips below. Next, draw a checkmark next to the one that shows the characters using good eye contact.

Student Activity Sheet D

Directions: Think about the script read/played for the class and complete the questions below.

1. Who are the characters in this script?

2. Where are the characters going?

3. Why is eye contact important?

4. How do you think Chris feels when Tori is not looking at him?

Student Activity Sheet E

Directions: In the scripts below, circle in purple two nouns that name a person and one noun that names a place. Circle in red two verbs. Put an X on each punctuation mark.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names describe an action, a state, or an occurrence.

An example of a script with children demonstrating appropriate eye contact:
(Looking at the conversation partner)
Chris: Hi Tori, how are you today?
Tori: I am fine Chris, thank you for asking.
Chris: Would you like to go to the park this afternoon?
Tori: That sounds great!

An example of a script with children avoiding making eye contact:
(Not looking at the conversation partner)
Chris: Hi Tori, how are you today?
Tori: ok
Chris: Why aren’t you looking at me?
Tori: What do you mean?
Chris: When someone is talking to you, you really should be looking at them. Otherwise, they don’t know that you are listening to them.

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Complete the following questions.

1. What is eye contact?

2. Why is it important to maintain eye contact during a conversation?

3. How do people feel when you do not make “good eye contact”?

4. Is it important to make eye contact when you are asking a person a question? Why or why not?