Identifying Anger - 1

Basic

Lesson Plan

Goal: In social situations, the student will identify anger in others in 8 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Recognize/identify the signs of anger in others (facial expressions, body language, vocabulary/tone of voice).
2. Identify possible triggers that may cause anger in peers/adults.

Definitions of Key Terms: Anger is a feeling people get when something unfair, painful, or bad happens. It is described as a feeling of displeasure.

Discussion Points:

  • Everyone feels anger.
  • It’s ok to feel angry.
  • Controlling your anger is what is most important.
  • You can learn ways to feel anger that don't hurt others or their feelings.

Discuss with students the meaning of anger. Review the discussion points with the students. The teacher may want to share their own examples of when he/she felt anger.

Possible activities to review the discussion points:

  • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
  • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a sticky note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right, they may put their team's marker (x or o) on the grid.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: What Does Anger Look Like?

Share the pictures with students (as seen below) or select your own pictures that show anger. Ask students to identify any of the following: facial expression, where the person’s hands are, and/or how their body is positioned. Have the students work collaboratively or take turns to identify the clues that are helpful to determine someone is angry.

Materials Needed:
  • Picture Cards
  • Chart paper or Interactive Board

Record answers on an interactive board or chart paper in the front of the group.

Record answers on an Interactive Board or chart paper in the front of the group.

Activity 2: Situations

Asking the students to take turns or work with a partner, create a list of scenarios/activities that often make a person angry. (Ex. Not winning a game.) Record the students’ answers on the chalkboard/Smartboard or chart paper in the front of the group.

Materials Needed:
  • Chart Paper or Interactive Board

Activity 3: Draw A Comic

Students should complete Student Activity Sheet A. If time allows, ask for volunteers to share their pictures. Assure students it is ok to feel anger. It is important to learn not to hurt others by getting angry.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 Per Student
  • Crayons, markers, colored pencils - for each student

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: Draw a picture of someone who is angry.

My character is angry because...

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Using Immersive Reader, students should listen carefully as the teacher shares the example scripts below. Replay the scripts if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet B.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 Per Student
  • Pencil for Each Student

After students have finished, allow those that want to share their comic do so or role play one of the example scripts.

Example Script: Handling Anger Appropriately
Mr. B: Donny, it is time to put away the toys and line up for lunch.
Donny: I’m having so much fun playing. I really don’t want to.
Mr. B: I understand you are having fun, but it is time for lunch.
Donny: Ok.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way connect text with lesson content while incorporating reading and language practice. Below are suggested titles reinforcing the SEL topic.

  • Angry Octopus, Lite, Lori
  • Cool Down and Work Through Anger, Meiners, Cheri J.
  • I Was So Mad, Mayer, Mercer
  • I Am So Angry, I Could Scream: Helping Children Deal with Anger, Fox, Laura
  • Mouse Was Mad, Urban, Linda
  • The Very Frustrated Monster, Green, Andi
  • When Miles Got Mad, Kurtzman-Counter, Sam
  • When I Feel Angry, Whitman, Albert

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Draw a comic showing what happened in the example script shared earlier with the group.

Application Activity

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating how to react to anger appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to assist the groups in creating scripts.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remind students to name and save their recordings. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialog with a phone or other recording device.

Example Script: Handling Anger Appropriately
Mr. B: Donny, it is time to put away the toys and line up for lunch.
Donny: I’m having so much fun playing. I really don’t want to.
Mr. B: I understand you are having fun, but it is time for lunch.
Donny: Ok.

Example Script: Handling Anger Appropriately
Mr. B: Donny, it is time to put away the toys and line up for lunch.
Donny: (angry) No, I don’t want to.
Mr. B: I understand you are having fun, but it is time for lunch.
Donny: (angry) No, you can’t make me!

Topic Checkout

Allow students time to complete the Student Topic Checkout. Discuss answers as a group when finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout
  • Pencil for each student

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Choose the best answer for each statement.

1. I get angry when I don’t win a game.

2. I get angry when I’m told no.

3. When my friend is not first, she shoves others in the line.

4. When my little brother does not win the game, he yells at me.

5. I make fists with my hands and want to pound my desk when I don’t understand my school work.