Handling Opposition - 2

Foundational

Table of Contents

Teachers

Definition: Handling opposition is defined as addressing a conflict toward another person when they are hostile and angry.

Discussion Points:

Questions:

  • Do you think it is easier to agree than disagree?
  • Can we learn how to get along with our friends and/or peers better by experiencing disagreements?
  • Should we be polite even if we are involved in a conflict?
  • Is it important to listen and hear when someone has an opposing viewpoint?
  • Can you have a relationship with a person who has an opposing viewpoint?
  • Discuss with students what it means to handle opposition. Review the discussion point questions.


      Possible activities to review the discussion point:

    • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
    • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a post-it note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their teams marker (x or o) on the grid.

Activity 1: Circumstances

As a class, make a list of circumstances describing when it is important to have an opposing view.

Example: When you are certain that something is wrong

Materials Needed:
  • Chart paper or chalkboard

Activity 2: Agree or Disagree

Assign students a partner and allow them to complete student activity sheet A. Discuss as a class how students felt after the activity is complete.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student
  • Pencil per group

Activity 3: Comic Strip Worksheet

Allow students time to complete student activity sheet B. When finished, have students share.

Materials Needed:
  • Student activity sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Utilizing the immersive reader students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts below. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on student activity sheet C.

After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet C - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student activity sheet D - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

Example script of someone having an opposing view appropriately:
Chris:Hey, don’t you think that it would be a good idea to walk to school tomorrow?
Tori: I heard it’s supposed to rain tomorrow so maybe we can walk to school another day. Let’s take the bus tomorrow.
Chris:That’s a great idea.

Example script of having an opposing view inappropriately:
Chris:I was thinking of donating money to promote environmental clean up.
Tori: That’s a terrible idea. I think donating money to help animals is a way better idea.
Chris:That hurt my feelings.
Tori:Too bad.

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity provide students a copy of student activity sheet B. Point out to students the features of script text to indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete activity sheet D.

Display the script using the immersive reader, highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named nouns. Repeat for verbs and syllables.

If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Script Writing and Animation

Review and discuss example scripts from lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating opposing appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to create students scripts.

Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remember to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Lesson Review

Allow students to complete the student lesson review sheet. Discuss answers when finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Lesson Review Sheet - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

Utilize current classroom literature that demonstrates handling opposition.

Students

Go to only student curriculum

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: Make a list of activities that you like to participate in or places you like to go. Then with a partner, compare your list and politely discuss why you might not agree with your partners choices.

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Study the comic strips below. Circle the answers that show that the characters having an opposing view.

Student Activity Sheet C

Who are the characters in this script?

Why does Tori say it is not a good idea to walk to school?

Who does Tori think it would be better to donate money to?

How do you think Chris feels when Tori disagrees with him?

How do you feel when others don’t see eye to eye with you?

Student Activity Sheet D

Directions: In the scripts below circle two nouns in purple and one verb in red.

Remember: A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea. A verb names describe an action, state, or occurrence

Example script of someone having an opposing view appropriately:
Chris:Hey, don’t you think that it would be a good idea to walk to school tomorrow?
Tori: I heard it’s supposed to rain tomorrow so maybe we can walk to school another day. Let’s take the bus tomorrow.
Chris:That’s a great idea.

Example script of having an opposing view inappropriately:
Chris:I was thinking of donating money to promote environmental clean up.
Tori: That’s a terrible idea. I think donating money to help animals is a way better idea.
Chris:That hurt my feelings.
Tori:Too bad.

Directions: How many syllables do you hear in the words below?

Student Lesson Review Sheet

Directions: Complete the following questions.

  1. Is it okay to have an opposing view?
  2. How do you oppose a position respectfully?
  3. What are some examples of circumstances when you may have to disagree with others?
  4. Why is having an opposing view important?