Conflict Resolution - 2

Foundational

Teachers

Goal: When in an educational setting (such as classroom, school building, virtual learning), will use a learned strategy to resolve a conflict, in 8 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Identify a conflict situation from a teacher presented list.
2. Identify situations that may lead to conflict.
3. Create a list of learned strategies to use in conflict situations.

Definitions of Key Terms: Conflict resolution is the ability to assess a social situation that is not going well and develop strategies to improve current and future interactions. It involves two or more people working together to find a peaceful solution to a disagreement or problem.

Questions to lead discussion:

  • What is a conflict?
  • Why should we attempt to solve a conflict in a peaceful way?
  • Can you give an example of what can cause a conflict?
  • Have you ever been involved in a disagreement or conflict with others (such as classmates, friends, siblings, etc.)?

How to resolve conflicts:

  • Identify the problem
  • Listen, be respectful, and be fair
  • Develop strategies to help
  • Implement the strategies

Discuss with students what conflict resolution means and why it is important. Review the discussion point questions.


Possible activities to review the discussion point:

  • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
  • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a post-it note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their teams marker (x or o) on the grid.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: Story Lines

In the large group, read the situations below and have the students give a thumbs up if they think it represents a conflict.

Materials Needed:
  • Listed Situations
  1. Anya and Ken want to participate in two different activities. They decide to take turns participating in one activity and then the other.
  2. Chris screamed and used bad language towards his friend when he did not get his way.
  3. Darren broke his buddy’s new video game and he doesn’t even care. Darren left without telling anyone the game was now broken.
  4. Beth did not attend an activity that she promised Tori she would attend. Tori waited and waited for Beth, but eventually left feeling disappointed and went back home.

Activity 2: The Ball Game

Assemble students into a wide circle. Tell students that they will be taking turns gently tossing a ball to each other. Using a soft ball or sphere, ask the first student to toss the ball to another student and have him/her verbalize what causes a conflict in his/her interactions with friends and peers. Once the student has shared their idea, they should then toss the ball to another student who takes his/her turn. The facilitator/teacher should record the statements shared on chart paper or the board.

Materials Needed:
  • Soft sphere or ball
  • Chart paper or interactive board
  • Questions below

When each student has had a turn to share, have students return to their seats. Review the ideas captured with the students. Next, as a group, choose some examples from the list of ideas to answer the questions below:

What is the problem?

  1. What are possible solutions to the problem?
  2. Can we prevent this situation from occurring again? If so, how?
  3. What skills are needed to resolve the conflict?

Alternately, you can create your own questions to ask.

Activity 3: Comic Strip Worksheet

Review the key points from the previous activities. Allow students time to complete Student Activity Sheet A. Discuss the answers when all students have finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: Read the comic strips below. Circle the answers that show the characters handling a conflict in a positive and peaceful way.

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts from the immersive reader. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet B.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student Activity Sheet C - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity, provide students a copy of Student Activity Sheet C. Point out to students the features of script text that indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Ask students to complete Student Activity Sheet C.

Display the script using the immersive reader and highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs and plural words.

If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

Example script of demonstrating appropriate conflict resolution:
Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
Tori: I don’t really like sledding but I will still go with you.
Darren: That’s so nice of you. Is there something you would like to do also?
Tori: Yes, I would love to go ice skating.

Example script of demonstrating inappropriate conflict resolution:
Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
Tori: I don’t like sledding at all. So no.
Darren: Why don’t you ever want to do what I want to do? I always have to do what you want.
Tori: I’m not going sledding and that’s it.
Darren: Wait, this just isn’t right! Why can’t we just take turns picking an activity. That’s what is fair to both of us.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Anton and the Battle, Ole Konnecke
  • Crayon, Simon Rickerty
  • Dave’s Rock, Frann Preston-Gannon
  • Enemy Pie, Derek Munson
  • I Don't Want to be a Pea!, Ann Bonwill
  • Talk and Work It Out, Cheri J. Meiners

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Think about the script read/played for the class and complete the questions below.

1. Who are the characters in this script?

2. What does Darren like to do?

3. What does Tori like to do?

4. How do you feel when someone insists on always doing what they want to do?

Student Activity Sheet C

Directions: In the scripts below, circle in purple two nouns that name a person and one noun that names a place. Circle in red two verbs. Underline the words that are plurals. As a bonus, write out the singular form of each plural word you find!

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names describe an action, a state, or an occurrence.

Example script of demonstrating appropriate conflict resolution:
Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
Tori: I don’t really like sledding but I will still go with you.
Darren: That’s so nice of you. Is there something you would like to do also?
Tori: Yes, I would love to go ice skating.

Example script of demonstrating inappropriate conflict resolution:
Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
Tori: I don’t like sledding at all so no.
Darren: Why don’t you ever want to do what I want to do. I always have to do what you want.
Tori: I’m not going sledding and that’s it.
Darren: Wait, this just isn’t right! Why can’t we just take turns picking an activity. That’s what is fair to everyone

Application Activity

Review and discuss example scripts from lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts resolving conflicts appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to create students' scripts.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remind students to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialogue with a phone or other recording device

Topic Checkout

Review the key points from the previous activities. Ask students to complete the Student Topic Checkout. Discuss the answers together when all students have finished.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout
  • Pencil for each student

Student Topic Checkout

Directions: Complete the following questions.

1. What is a conflict?

2. What is conflict resolution?

3. Give three examples of when a conflict can occur.

4. Why is it important to resolve the conflicts that we have with other people?

5. List as many strategies as you can think of on how to resolve a conflict or disagreement.