Conflict Resolution - 2

Foundational

Table of Contents

Teachers

Definition: Conflict resolution is the ability to assess a social situation that is not going well and to develop strategies to improve the current interaction and interactions in the future.

Discussion Points:

Questions:

  • What is a conflict?
  • Why should we attempt to diffuse a conflict?
  • Can you give an example of what can cause a conflict?
  • Discussion Topics:

    How to resolve conflicts:

  • Identify the problem
  • Develop strategies to help
  • Listen, be respectful, and be fair
  • Implement the strategies

  • Discuss with students what conflict resolution means and why it is important. Review the discussion point questions.


      Possible activities to review the discussion point:

    • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
    • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a post-it note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their teams marker (x or o) on the grid.

    Activity 1: Story Lines

    In the large group, read the scenarios below and have the students raise their hands if they think they represent a conflict.

    1. Anya and Ken want to participate in two different activities. They both decide to take turns during both activities.
    2. Chris used bad language towards his friend when he did not get his way.
    3. Darren broke his buddy’s new video game and he doesn’t even care.
    4. Beth did not attend an activity that she promised Tori she would attend.
    Materials Needed:
    • Listed Scenarios

    Activity 2: The Ball Game

    In a large group, have the students play a ball game. Each student should throw the ball to a friend and have him or her verbalize what causes a conflict in their interactions with friends and peers. The student should then throw the ball to another student who takes his/her turn. The facilitator should record the statements. Next, as a group choose some examples to answer the questions below:

    Materials Needed:
    • Ball
    • Chart paper or chalkboard
    • Questions below

    What is the problem?

    What are possible solutions to the problem?

    Can we prevent this situation from occurring again? If so, how?

    What skills are needed to resolve the conflict?

    Activity 3: Comic Strip Worksheet

    Allow students time to complete student activity sheet A. Discuss answers when finished.

    Materials Needed:
    • Student activity sheet A - 1 per student
    • Pencil for each student

    Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

    Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Utilizing the immersive reader students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts below. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on student activity sheet B.

    After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

    Materials Needed:
    • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
    • Pencil for each student
    • Student activity sheet C - 1 per student
    • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

    Example script of demonstrating appropriate conflict resolution:
    Darren::Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
    Tori: I don’t really like sledding but I will still go with you.
    Darren::That’s so nice of you. Is there something you would like to do also?
    Tori: Yes, I would love to go ice skating.

    Example script of demonstrating inappropriate conflict resolution:
    Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
    Tori: I don’t like sledding at all so no.
    Darren: Why don’t you ever want to do what I want to do. I always have to do what you want.
    Tori: I’m not going sledding and that’s it.
    Darren: Wait, this just isn’t right! Why can’t we just take turns picking an activity. That’s what is fair to everyone

    After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity provide students a copy of student activity sheet C. Point out to students the features of script text to indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

    Allow students time to complete activity sheet C.

    Display the script using the immersive reader, highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs and syllables.

    If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

    Script Writing and Animation

    Review and discuss example scripts from lesson extension.

    In small groups, have the students create scripts resolving conflicts appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to create students scripts.

    Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remember to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

    Materials Needed:
    • Script sheet for each group
    • Pencil for each student

    Lesson Review

    Allow students to complete the student lesson review sheet. Discuss answers when finished.

    Materials Needed:
    • Student Lesson Review Sheet
    • Pencil for each student

    Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

    • Talk and Work It Out by Cheri J. Meiners
    • Anton and the Battle by Ole Konnecke
    • Crayon by Simon Rickerty
    • Dave’s Rock by Frann Preston-Gannon
    • Enemy Pie by Derek Munson
    • I Don't Want to be a Pea! by Ann Bonwill

    Students

    Go to only student curriculum

    Student Activity Sheet A

    Directions: Study the comic strips below. Circle the answers that show the characters handling a conflict appropriately

    Student Activity Sheet B

    Who are the characters in this script?

    What does Darren like to do?

    What does Tori like to do?

    How do you feel when someone insists on always doing what they want to do?

    Student Activity Sheet C

    Directions: In the scripts below circle two nouns in purple that name a person and one noun that names a place. In red circle two verbs.

    Remember:

    A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

    A verb names describe an action, state, or occurrence.

    Example script of demonstrating appropriate conflict resolution:
    Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
    Tori: I don’t really like sledding but I will still go with you.
    Darren: That’s so nice of you. Is there something you would like to do also?
    Tori: Yes, I would love to go ice skating.

    Example script of demonstrating inappropriate conflict resolution:
    Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
    Tori: I don’t like sledding at all so no.
    Darren: Why don’t you ever want to do what I want to do. I always have to do what you want.
    Tori: I’m not going sledding and that’s it.
    Darren: Wait, this just isn’t right! Why can’t we just take turns picking an activity. That’s what is fair to everyone

    Directions: How many syllables do you hear in the words below?

    Student Lesson Review Sheet

    Directions: Complete the following questions.

    1. What is a conflict?

    2. What is conflict resolution?

    3. Give three examples of when a conflict can occur.

    4. Why is it important to resolve the conflicts that we have with other people?