Conflict Resolution - 1

Basic

Table of Contents

Teachers

Definition: Conflict resolution is the ability to assess a social situation that is not going well and to develop strategies to improve the current interaction and interactions in the future.

Discussion Points:

Questions:

  • What is a conflict?
  • Why should we attempt to diffuse a conflict?
  • Can you give an example of what can cause a conflict?
  • What can happen if you don’t handle a conflict correctly.

  • Discuss with students what conflict resolution means and why it is important. Review the discussion point questions.


      Possible activities to review the discussion point:

    • The group should form a circle. Ask a question and allow students to toss a bean bag to those who would like to answer the question.
    • Play tic-tac-toe by dividing the group into teams. Write discussion questions on a post-it note and place them on the tic-tac-toe grid. Allow a representative from the team to select a post-it note and as a team develop an answer to the question. If they get it right they may put their teams marker (x or o) on the grid.

    Activity 1: Story Lines

    Assist students in having a clear understanding of what a conflict is. Develop a list of possible conflicts and list them on the board.

    Examples:

  • Anya and Ken want to participate in two different activities.
  • Chris always wants to be first in the lunch line.
  • Donny is never willing to share the swings.
  • Mom says it’s time to do your chores and you don’t want to.

  • Now develop a list of possible solutions for when conflicts arise.


    Examples:

  • Ask for help
  • Go outside
  • Take a walk
  • Work on a compromise
  • Take some deep breaths
  • Think about the size of the problem

  • Write down each possible solution on a tongue depressor. Once you are finished place the tongue depressors in a mason jar. Explain to students that next time they have a conflict and are unsure what to do they can look through the conflict resolution jar for a solution.

    Materials Needed:
    • Chart Paper or Chalkboard
    • Tongue depressors
    • Marker
    • Mason jar labeled “Conflict Resolution Jar”

    Activity 2: Stoplight

    Instruct the students to close their eyes and picture a stoplight.

    When the red light is on, they should take three deep breaths and think of something that calms them.

    When it turns yellow it is time to evaluate the conflict. Possible things to think about: Can I handle this on my own? Do I need an adult to help me? What are some possible conflict resolution strategies that might help?

    When the light turns green they should select the best strategy and give it a try.

    Practice the following scenarios:

  • You want a turn on the swings but your friend isn’t sharing.
  • Your friend always wants to go first when playing a game.
  • A kid in the cafeteria tells you your shirt is ugly.

  • Materials Needed:
    • Scenarios

    Activity 3: Scenarios

    Before class write each conflict scenario on an index card.

    Assign students into groups. Give each group a conflict scenario. On the back of the index card write or draw how they would resolve the conflict.

    Scenarios:

    1. You want to pick a game to play today but your friend won’t let you. What will you do?
    2. The student in line behind you keeps poking you. What will you do?
    3. You are trying to talk to your parent but another family member keeps interrupting you. What will you do?
    4. Someone calls you a name at recess. What will you do?
    5. Your best friend doesn’t invite you to her birthday party. What will you do?
    Materials Needed:
    • Conflict Scenarios
    • Index cards
    • Pencil for each group

    Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension

    Explain that a script is a form of writing; a dialogue between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Utilizing the immersive reader students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example script below. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to complete student activity sheet A and share.

    Materials Needed:
    • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per student
    • Pencil for each student

    Example script of demonstrating appropriate conflict resolution:
    Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
    Tori: I don’t really like sledding but I will still go with you.
    Darren: That’s so nice of you. Is there something you would like to do also?
    Tori: Yes, I would love to go ice skating.

    If time allows students may partner together and role play the script.

    Script Writing and Animation

    In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating appropriate and inappropriate conflict resolution. Use the script sheet to create students scripts.

    Materials Needed:
    • Script sheet for each group
    • Pencil for each student

    Example script of demonstrating appropriate conflict resolution:
    Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
    Tori: I don’t really like sledding but I will still go with you.
    Darren: That’s so nice of you. Is there something you would like to do also?
    Tori: Yes, I would love to go ice skating.

    This is an example of an inappropriate script on gaining attention:
    Darren: Hey, I really want to go sledding. Do you want to go?
    Tori: I don’t like sledding at all so no.
    Darren: Why don’t you ever want to do what I want to do. I always have to do what you want.
    Tori: I’m not going sledding and that’s it.
    Darren: Wait, this just isn’t right! Why can’t we just take turns picking an activity. That’s what is fair to everyone.

    Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remember to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

    Lesson Review

    Allow students to complete the student lesson review sheet. Discuss answers when finished.

    Materials Needed:
    • Student Lesson Review Sheet
    • Pencil for each student

    Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

    • Talk and Work It Out by Cheri J. Meiners
    • Anton and the Battle by Ole Konnecke
    • Crayon by Simon Rickerty
    • Dave’s Rock by Frann Preston-Gannon
    • Enemy Pie by Derek Munson
    • I Don't Want to be a Pea! by Ann Bonwill

    Students

    Go to only student curriculum

    Student Activity Sheet A

    Directions: Draw a comic to match the script you listened to.

    Student Lesson Review Sheet

    Directions: Think of a stop light. Fill in the missing colors.

    green yellow red

    When the light is on, they should take three deep breaths and think of something that calms them.

    When it turns it is time to evaluate the conflict. Possible things to think about: Can I handle this on my own? Do I need an adult to help me? What are some possible conflict resolution strategies that might help?

    When the light turns they should select the best strategy and give it a try.