Active Listening - 2

Foundational

Teachers

Goal: When in an educational setting (i.e.-classroom, virtual learning session, etc.), the student will use active listening strategies, 8 out of 10 observable opportunities, as measured by a teacher assessment tool.

Objectives:
1. Follow directions given by an adult.
2. Display body language of an active listener.
3. Ask relevant questions related to the topic or situation.

Definitions of Key Terms: Active listening shows others you care and are paying attention to what they are saying. Active listening helps you know and understand what is being said. Active listening includes facing the speaker, not interrupting, and asking relevant questions for the topic.

Discussion Points

  • You use active listening when you are sitting quietly in class and paying attention to what your teacher is saying.
  • You use active listening when you are talking with your friends and you are focused on what they are saying.
  • You use active listening at home when you are listening to your family share about their day.

    Questions

  • What is active listening?
  • Why is active listening important?
  • How does it make you feel when someone is not using active listening strategies when talking with you?
  • How does whole body listening help you?

Discuss with students what it means to actively listen and why it is important. Review the discussion point questions.


Possible activities to review the discussion points or use your own:

Think. Pair. Share: The teacher will pose questions related to the discussion points. Explain to students that the purpose of the activity is to think about the question and activate prior knowledge. The teacher will model the procedure to facilitate student understanding.

  • T (Think): Teacher begins by asking a specific question using the discussion topics.
  • P (Pair): Each student should be paired with another student, small group or work with a teacher. Pairs write brief answers on sticky notes or scrap paper.
  • S (Share): Students share their thinking with their partner. Teacher then leads a whole-group conversation using students’ answers.

SEL Categories Activity:

  • Ask students to create a list of words associated with the topic (give them 2-5 minutes to complete).
  • Once time is up, ask each student to share a word or thought from their list.
  • Other students must cross that word or thought off their list.
  • Continue the process until all words or thoughts have been listed.

Directions for In-Person or Virtual Learning: You have three options for students to complete this lesson.

  • Option 1: Print the Student Activity Sheet for each student. Complete the lesson as a group and assign the activity sheet to the students.
  • Option 2: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and post to your Learning Management System (if your school has one) or send the link to the student. The student may complete the activity sheet electronically within the classroom on a shared computer or device.
  • Option 3: Click the Student link to access the activity sheet electronically and send the link to the student. The student may access the link from a home computer, chromebook, iPad or other device.

Activity 1: What Is Active Listening

What is active listening? Using a Potato Head is a great way to visually present the components of whole body listening. You may use Mr. Potato Head or a large picture of a body to illustrate and discuss the components of active listening.

Materials Needed:
  • Potato Head or large picture of a body
  • Student Activity Sheet A - 1 per person or group
  • Pencil - 1 per person or group

When you are using active listening, you are listening with your whole body.

  1. You stop what you are doing, and your body is still (stand like a statue)
  2. Your ears are listening to the speaker (point to ears)
  3. Your eyes are watching the speaker (point to eyes)
  4. Your mouth is quiet (pinch lips closed)
  5. Listen with your heart (point to heart)

Allow students time to complete student activity sheet A individual, with a partner, or in a small group. Discuss answers when finished.

Ask students to share situations in which they did not actively listen or when someone they were talking with did not use active listening. Discuss how the other person looked or acted. You may also want to rearrange the body parts on the Mr. Potato Head to show the difference when you are not using active listening.

Ask students time to complete Student Activity Sheet A individually, with a partner, or in a small group. Discuss the answers when finished.

Student Activity Sheet A

Directions: Make a list of situations when it is important to use active listening.

Example: During a fire drill

Activity 2: Game Time!

Practice listening carefully to others by playing one or more of the following games.

Materials Needed:
  • None
  • Class story: Start with a single sentence. Students must actively listen as each member of the class adds another sentence to the story. The sentence added to the story must make sense.
  • Twenty questions: Tell the class you are an item that starts with a certain letter, an object in the room, a movie character, or anything creative you can think of. The class may ask 20 yes or no questions in order to try and figure out who or what you are. They must listen carefully to figure it out.

After the game is finished, discuss whether it was easy or hard to use active listening with the students. Ask for students to share any other thoughts or insights they have about active listening.

Activity 3: Thumbs up, thumbs down

Ask the class to listen to the scenarios listed below (or create your own). If the scenario describes good active listening the students should give the teacher a thumbs up. If it describes poor active listening they should give a thumbs down.

Materials Needed:
  • Scenarios Below

Scenario 1: Silas and PJ are at the bus stop. Silas is telling PJ about his camping trip he recently took. PJ is busy watching the cars go by.

Scenario 2: Tori and Chris are in the living room listening to Donny read a story. They are sitting still and carefully watching and listening to Donny.

Scenario 3: Officer Dave and Mr. B are in the park. Officer Dave is sharing with Mr. B about a lost dog. Mr. B continually interrupts Officer Dave with questions and information he wants to share about his own pet.

Scenario 4: Lexi and Anya are in the hallway talking with Dr. Sally. Lexi is looking at her cell phone and listening to her new favorite song.

Scenario 5: Donny and PJ are in the cafeteria. Mr. B asks that all students give him their full attention. Donny and PJ stop talking and turn to look at Mr. B. They sit very still as he explains the surprise he has for the students.

Discuss how each character did or did not display active listening. Also discuss how they think the characters felt when the others were not actively listening.

Lesson Extension: Listening Comprehension and Grammar Review

Explain that a script is a form of dialogue writing between characters in a movie, play, or broadcast. Be sure to point out that any text in parentheses is used to show you what the person would be doing, if the dialogue was an actual movie or play.

Students should listen carefully as the teacher plays the example scripts from the immersive reader. Replay the script if needed. Allow students time to answer the questions on Student Activity Sheet B.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Activity Sheet B - 1 per student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Student Activity Sheet C - 1 per student
  • Red and purple colored pencil or crayon

After students have finished, discuss the listening comprehension questions together.

After completing the listening comprehension portion of this activity, provide students a copy of Student Activity Sheet C. Point out the features of script text that indicate which character is talking. Remind students that this is a dialogue between characters.

Allow students time to complete Student Activity Sheet C.

Display the script using the immersive reader, highlight the nouns in the script. Students should self-check their work to determine if they correctly named two nouns. Repeat the process for verbs and adjectives.

If time allows, students may partner and role play the script.

Example script of demonstrating active listening appropriately:
Dr. Sally: Tori, will you please share with me about your book you read.
Tori: (Looking directly at Dr. Sally and standing still) Sure, it is about a boy who wanted a new puppy and got one for Christmas.
Dr. Sally: (Looking directly at Tori and standing still) That sounds like a really good book.

Example script of not demonstrating active listening appropriately:
Dr. Sally: Tori, will you please share with me about your book you read.
Tori: (Back faces Dr. Sally, moving around) Sure, it is about a boy who wanted a new puppy and got one for Christmas.
Dr. Sally: (Back faces Tori, walking away) That sounds like a really good book.

Read Aloud Recommendations: Completing a read aloud with students is a great way for them to see and learn social skills as well as incorporating reading skills. Below are some books that could be used to reinforce the concept. Read and discuss as appropriate for level and as time allows throughout the lesson.

  • Howard B. Wigglebottom Learns to Listen,, Howard Binkow
  • Listen Buddy, Helen Lester
  • Why Should I Listen?, Claire Llewellyn

Student Activity Sheet B

Directions: Think about the script read/played for the class and complete the questions below.

    1. Who are the characters in this script?

    2. What did Dr. Sally ask Tori to do?

    3. Why is active listening important?

    4. How do you think Dr. Sally felt when Tori was not demonstrating active listening?

    5. How do you feel when others are not paying full attention to you when you are speaking?

Student Activity Sheet C

Directions: In the scripts below, circle in purple two nouns that name a person and one noun that names a place. Circle in red two verbs. Underline any adjectives.

Remember:

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

A verb names describe an action, a state, or an occurrence.

An adjective describes a noun.

Example script of demonstrating active listening appropriately:
Dr. Sally: Tori, will you please share with me about your book you read.
Tori: (Looking directly at Dr. Sally and standing still) Sure, it is about a boy who wanted a new puppy and got one for Christmas.
Dr. Sally: (Looking directly at Tori and standing still) That sounds like a really good book.

Example script of not demonstrating active listening appropriately:
Dr. Sally: Tori, will you please share with me about your book you read.
Tori: (Back facing Dr. Sally, moving around) Sure, it is about a boy who wanted a new puppy and got one for Christmas.
Dr. Sally: (Back facing Tori, walking away) That sounds like a really good book.

Application Activity

Review and discuss example scripts from the lesson extension.

In small groups, have the students create scripts demonstrating active listening appropriately and inappropriately. Use the script sheet to help create students' scripts.

Materials Needed:
  • Script sheet for each group
  • Pencil for each student

Have students record their scripts using the SiLAS software. Remind students to name and save their work. Premiere the movies with the group members at the end of each session.

Ideas for modifying this activity based on your students’ needs:

  • create a script as a class
  • pair or group students so that skill levels are varied and assign each a role or task that uses their skill
  • create the script by recording the dialogue with a phone or other recording device

Topic Checkout

Review the key points from previous activities with the students.

Ask students to complete the Student Topic Checkout. When all have finished, review and discuss the answers.

Materials Needed:
  • Student Topic Checkout - 1 per student
  • A pencil for each student

Student Topic Checkout

Fill in the blank with an answer from the table.

active body ears heart eyest whole
  1. You demonstrate active listening with your body.
  2. Your are listening to the speaker.
  3. listening shows you care.
  4. Your is still when you demonstrate active listening.
  5. Your are looking at the speaker when you demonstrate active listening.
  6. It is important to listen with your so you can understand what others are saying.


7. What is active listening?

8. Why is active listening important?

9. When do you use active listening?

10. How do you feel when your friends use active listening when talking with you?